Monday, April 25, 2016

Writing Workshops with Author/Teacher Chris Eboch

Online, in May: I'll be teaching an online workshop on Advanced Plotting: Keep Those Pages Turning.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Many books and workshops teach the basics of plotting: conflict, complications, and climax. Now learn advanced techniques that will make a decent plot dynamic. Start with a “grab you by the throat” opening to pull readers into the story. Learn how to pack the plot full by complicating your complications. Control your pacing through sentence and paragraph length. And finally, cliffhanger chapter endings ensure late-night reading under the covers. Learn techniques to make any story or book better. Novelists will benefit from these insights, whether they are just starting out or have years of experience.

COST:  $125, which includes weekly assignments and individual feedback from the instructor. This class will be conducted through a Discussion Board, with the opportunity for students to ask questions and post homework samples.

BUY NOW: Advanced Plotting with Chris Eboch (4 weeks, starting 5/4/2016) Limit: 15 students. Early registration is recommended.


New York, in June: I'll present three workshops at the 21st Century Children's Nonfiction Conference. The conference is June 10-12 at Iona College in New Rochelle, NY. To learn more about the conference, visit the website.

My programs are:

Children's Nonfiction 101: Friday Intensives (an optional extra three-hour intensive): If you are new to children’s nonfiction publishing, or want a refresher about the current terminology, markets, and acquisition process, this intensive will be invaluable. Presented with Caryn Wiseman (Andrea Brown Literary Agency) and Michelle Bisson (Capstone).

Show Me the Money: What can an author earn? Learn how writers are making a living, through original book projects, work for hire books, magazines, test passages and more. Explore how to reach some of the less obvious markets, and discuss the attitude changes that need to happen to turn writing into a business.

How to Find NF Work: Where can you look? How do you follow up leads? Learn where and how best to connect with publishers, book packagers, and digital developers at conferences, book fairs, and exhibitions. Presented with author Jennifer Swanson


August, in North Carolina: I'll present two workshops at the Writers Who Run Retreat, August 3-6 in Fontana Dam, NC. You'll enjoy three full days packed with a morning 2-mile trail run (optional), breakfast, two 2-hour intensive workshops focused on craft and the business of writing, lunch, roundtable critique groups, free writing time, dinner, and a fun social event each evening. Learn more at the website.

My programs are:

Plotting Techniques: Are you struggling to plot your novel, or do you have a plot that  isn't working? Chris will help you learn how to plot like a pro.

Revisions that Sing: Revising and editing looks easy when Chris shows you how. Learn lots of tips and tricks to help tighten your manuscripts


If you wind up at any of these events, please be sure to say hi!

Chris Eboch is the author of almost 50 published books. Her writing craft books include Advanced Plotting and You Can Write for Children: How to Write Great Stories, Articles, and Books for Kids and Teenagers. She has sold over 60 writing articles to Writers Digest, Children’s Writer, and the annual Writer’s Guides.

Chris’s novels for ages nine and up include The Eyes of Pharaoh, a mystery in ancient Egypt; The Well of Sacrifice, a Mayan adventure; The Genie’s Gift, a middle eastern fantasy; and the Haunted series. Her recent nonfiction titles, published under the name M. M. Eboch, include World War I Battlefield Medicine, Native American Code Talkers, A History of Film, and Chaco Canyon. Learn more at www.chriseboch.com or her Amazon page.

Chris also writes for adults under the name Kris Bock. Kris Bock writes action-packed romantic suspense involving outdoor adventures and Southwestern landscapes. Read excerpts at www.krisbock.com or visit her Amazon page.

Monday, April 11, 2016

The Ghost Miner’s Treasure from Spellbound River Press

What do you do when a ghost needs your help?

Thirteen-year-old Jon and his eleven-year-old sister, Tania, are typical kids – except for the fact that Tania can communicate with ghosts. Their mom and stepdad are producers of a ghost-hunter reality television show, but they don’t know about Tania’s gift, and Tania wants to keep it that way.

Jon can't see ghosts and didn't believe in them, but things are getting too crazy for any other explanation. And if softhearted Tania wants to help the ghosts, Jon will have to protect her and try to keep them both out of trouble.

In The Ghost Miner’s Treasure, Jon and Tania travel with the ghost hunter TV show to the Superstition Mountains of Arizona. The crew visits an abandoned mining town, where the ghost of an old miner is still looking for his lost mine.

Tania is determined to help the old miner move on. But to do that they must resolve the problem keeping him here, which means helping him find his mine. And that means taking the TV crew deep into the rugged land of deserts and canyons.

In the words of an old fortuneteller, “Many dangers you face on this quest. Many trials.”

But they could hardly have imagined the trouble this adventure would bring! 

"The action never lets up in this fast-paced story, with something exciting happening in every chapter." – Reader Review

Aladdin/Simon & Schuster released the first three Haunted books in 2008. Now The Ghost Miner's Treasure is back in print from Spellbound River Press.

School Library Journal said of the series, “Haunted is a fun read with some thrills and chills and has the added bonus of some genuine, compassionate personalities.” 

A reader review noted,"What I loved most of all, was the way my 4th grade daughter got sucked into the story. She’s a reluctant reader so it was a joy to see her completely absorbed in a book; she immediately started the second book in the series when she finished, and can’t wait for more." 


Chris Eboch writes fiction and nonfiction for all ages, with several novels for ages nine and up. In Bandits Peak, a teenage boy meets strangers hiding on the mountains and gets drawn into their crimes, until he risks his life to expose them. The Eyes of Pharaoh is an action-packed mystery set in ancient Egypt. The Genie’s Gift draws on the mythology of 1001 Arabian Nights to take readers on a fantasy adventure. In The Well of Sacrifice, a Mayan girl in ninth-century Guatemala rebels against the High Priest who sacrifices anyone challenging his power. 

Monday, March 28, 2016

21st Century Children’s Nonfiction Conference

The 21st Century Children’s Nonfiction Conference is the interchange for everyone connected with Children’s Nonfiction … publishers, authors, illustrators, educators, librarians, and digital developers. This weekend of workshops, publisher panels, open-table conversations, and social gatherings provides excellent opportunities to learn and connect with people at the leading edge of this field.

June 10-12 at Iona College, New Rochelle, New York.
Conference details are at www.21CNFC.com


I'll be presenting three workshops:

Children's Nonfiction 101
If you are new to children’s nonfiction publishing, or want a refresher about the current terminology, markets, and acquisition process, this intensive will be invaluable. Topics include: The categories of nonfiction for different ages; Does nonfiction have to be 100% true?; The difference between trade and educational publishing; Work for hire books, magazine articles, and test passages; Identifying markets and targeting your work to specific markets; What publishers look for in samples or submissions; and Writing nonfiction that reads like fiction.

Presented by: Caryn Wiseman (Andrea Brown Literary Agency), Chris Eboch (Author/Instructor), Michelle Bisson (Capstone)

Show Me the Money
What can an author earn? Learn how writers are making a living, through original book projects, work for hire books, magazines, test passages and more. Explore how to reach some of the less obvious markets, and discuss the attitude changes that need to happen to turn writing into a business.

Presented by: Chris Eboch (Author/Instructor)

How to Find NF Work
Where can you look? How do you follow up leads? Learn where and how best to connect with publishers, book packagers, and digital developers at conferences, book fairs, and exhibitions.

Presented by: Chris Eboch (Author/Instructor) and Jennifer Swanson (Author)

This is only a small sampling of the great programming at the conference. Please join us if you have the chance, and say "Hi" at some point during the weekend! See the complete faculty list and schedule here.

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

#Free Romantic Suspense in the Southwest

Whispers in the Dark is romantic suspense with archaeology and intrigue among ancient Southwest ruins. 

Reviewers give it a 4.3 star average: “This book was a delight from start to finish!”

Get your Kindle copy today, Free! March 22-25.

Whispers in the Dark


Kylie Hafford craves adventure during her southwestern summer. She doesn’t expect to fight for her life.
After an assault in Boston, the young archeologist heads to the remote Puebloan ruins of Lost Valley, Colorado, to excavate. Her first exploration of the crumbling ruins ends in a confrontation with a gorgeous, angry man who looks like a warrior from the Pueblo’s ancient past. Danesh proves that Kylie’s body is ready for love, even if her heart isn’t. If only he weren’t so aggravating. Then she literally stumbles into Sean. His attentions feel safer, but she suspects he's not the simple tourist he claims to be.
The summer heats up as Kylie finds mysteries – and surprising friendships – among the ancient ruins. Mysterious lights, murmuring voices, and equipment gone missing plague her dig. Kylie tries to play it safe, but when someone threatens her research, she must take action. She has more enemies than she can possibly guess, and she’s only begun to glimpse the terrors in the dark. She’ll need all her strength and wits to survive. Everything becomes clear – if she wants to save the man she’s starting to love and see the villains brought to justice, she can’t run away again – she must face her fears and fight.

"Wonderfully detailed scenery and diverse characters combine with a clever, well-defined plot in Whispers in the Dark to create an exciting, hard to put down story. Well written and quite enjoyable!" - Reviewed By Melinda Hills for Readers’ Favorite 

Whispers in the Dark Excerpt

A shout slashed the air. I twisted so fast I tumbled onto my backside.

I gaped up at the man towering over me. Bare chest, muscular and bronzed. Black hair pulled back from a face full of sharp planes and angles. Dark eyes fierce under scowling brows.

My heart jolted painfully. I’d come face to face with an ancient warrior. He was gorgeous.

And furious.

At me.

“Don’t you read signs?”

I blinked at the apparition. “Uh....”

He gestured back at the main path. “The signs at every turn saying ‘Stay on the path’? The notice at the entrance telling you to leave artifacts alone? I could have you arrested and fined.”

Oh. I felt color flooding my cheeks. My pounding heart refused to slow yet, and the rush of adrenaline turned my arms and legs to jelly, but I rose steadily enough. I tried to ignore the heat in my face and the queasy feeling of panic in my stomach, which hadn’t yet accepted the message that I wasn’t in danger. “I’m Kylie Hafford,” I said coolly. “The archaeologist. Are you Danesh?”

I saw a satisfying flash of surprise and then guilt. Or maybe I had just imagined it, as his face settled immediately into a neutral mask. “Yes, I’m Danesh.” He hesitated before adding stiffly, “It’s nice to meet you.”

“The pleasure’s all mine.”

He must have caught my irony, because he almost smiled—I think. He said, “I’m sorry I startled you. I wasn’t expecting you yet, and....” He shrugged. “I’ve been noticing scuff marks in the ground, off the trail where tourists aren’t supposed to go. I figured someone was poking around, maybe looking for treasure.”

“And you assumed I was your treasure hunter?”

Buy Links:

Reader Praise for Whispers in the Dark:

“All in all, a great read, with a strong plot line, and likeable characters! I highly recommend this author!”

“The glimpses of life in the southwest and the ruins of the Ancient Ones were fascinating. The main character's emotional journey is well-drawn and satisfying. A quick read that should please plenty of readers!”

“Whispers in the Dark has a hefty dose of adventure and mystery, as well as a strong main character. I highly recommend this author!”

“The southwest setting and attention to authentic details will make the reader feel like he/she knows the place once the book is finished.”

“It has mystery, suspense, action, drama, romance, and some comic moments. The setting is unique and interesting.”


Kris Bock writes novels of suspense and romance involving outdoor adventures and Southwestern landscapes. Read excerpts at www.krisbock.com or visit her Amazon pageSign up for Kris Bock newsletter for announcements of new books, sales, and more.

The Mad Monk’s Treasure follows the hunt for a long-lost treasure in the New Mexico desert. In The Dead Man’s Treasure, estranged relatives compete to reach a buried treasure by following a series of complex clues. In Counterfeits, stolen Rembrandt paintings bring danger to a small New Mexico town. What We Found is a mystery with strong romantic elements about a young woman who finds a murder victim in the woods. 




Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Editing Your Novel during #NaNoEdMo – Editing Tips

In honor of #NaNoEdMo (National Novel Editing Month), I'm sharing some advice from You Can Write for Children: A Guide to Writing Great Stories, Articles, and Books for Kids and TeenagersTwo weeks ago I offered advice on “big picture” editing. Last week I covered Fine Tuning. Here are some final quick tips on editing to help you through NaNoEdMo.

Editing Tips:

Don’t try to edit everything at once. Make several passes, looking for different problems. Start big, then focus in on details.

Try writing a one- or two-sentence synopsis. Define your goal. Do you want to produce an action-packed thriller? A laugh-out-loud book that will appeal to preteen boys? A richly detailed historical novel about a character’s internal journey? Identifying your goal can help you make decisions about what to cut and what to keep.

  • Next make a scene list, describing what each scene does.
  • Do you need to make major changes to the plot, characters, setting, or theme (fiction) or the focus of the topic (nonfiction)?
  • Does each scene fulfill the synopsis goal? How does it advance plot, reveal character, or both?
  • Does each scene build and lead to the next? Are any redundant? If you cut the scene, would you lose anything? Can any secondary characters be combined or eliminated?
  • Does anything need to be added or moved? Do you have a length limit or target?
  • Can you increase the complications, so that at each step, more is at stake, there’s greater risk or a better reward? If each scene has the same level of risk and consequence, the pacing is flat and the middle sags.
  • Check for accuracy. Are your facts correct? Are your characters and setting consistent?
  • Does each scene (in fiction) or paragraph (in nonfiction) follow a logical order and stick to the topic?
  • Is your point of view consistent?
  • Do you have dynamic language: Strong, active verbs? A variety of sentence lengths (but mostly short and to the point)? No clichés? Do you use multiple senses (sight, sound, taste, smell, touch)?
  • Finally, edit for spelling and punctuation.

(For detailed editing questions, see my Plot Outline Exercise. It’s in my book Advanced Plotting or available as a free Word download on my website.)

Editing Description

For each detail, ask:

  • Does it make the story more believable?
  • Does it help readers picture or understand a character or place better?
  • Does it answer questions that readers might want answered?
  • Does it distract from the action?
  • Could it be removed without confusing readers or weakening the story?
  • For illustrated work, could the description be replaced by illustrations?

Use more details for unusual/unfamiliar settings. Try using multiple senses: sights, sounds, smells, tastes, and the feeling of touch. Especially in picture books, use senses other than sight, which can be shown through the illustrations.

Editing Resources:
Print/Ebook
Advanced Plotting, by Chris Eboch
Self-Editing for Fiction Writers, by Renni Browne and Dave King
Style That Sizzles & Pacing for Power – An Editor’s Guide to Writing Compelling Fiction, by Jodie Renner
Manuscript Makeover, by Elizabeth Lyon
Novel Metamorphosis, by Darcy Pattison
Revision & Self-Editing, by James Scott Bell
Thanks, But This Isn’t For Us, by Jessica Page Morrell

Online
I haven’t tried this, but the “Hemingway App” is designed to identify overly long or complicated sentences, so it might be helpful in learning to simplify your work for younger audiences:

Grammarly is a free app that claims to find more errors than Microsoft Word’s spelling and grammar check option, including words that are spelled correctly but used incorrectly:

Resources for Writers, by editor Jodie Renner, list several of her editing books as well as blog posts on various writing topics.

The Plot Outline Exercise from Advanced Plotting helps you analyze your plot for trouble spots. (It’s available as a free Word download on my website, in the left-hand column of this page.)

Middle grade author Janice Hardy’s Fiction University blog has great posts on many writing craft topics.

Author and writing teacher Jordan McCollum offers downloadable free writing guides on topics such as character arcs and deep point of view.

In “A Bad Case of Revisionitis,” Literary agent Natalie M. Lakosil discusses when to stop revising.

Subscribe to get posts automatically and never miss a post. You can use the Subscribe buttons to the right, or add http://chriseboch.blogspot.com/ to Feedly or another reader.

You can get the extended version of this essay, and a lot more, in You Can Write for Children: A Guide to Writing Great Stories, Articles, and Books for Kids and Teenagers. Order for Kindle, in paperback, or in Large Print paperback. Advanced Plotting also has advice on editing novels.

Chris Eboch writes fiction and nonfiction for all ages, with over 30 traditionally published books for children. Learn more at www.chriseboch.com or her Amazon page, or check out her writing tips at her Write Like a Pro! blog. Sign up for Chris’s Workshop Newsletter for classes and critique offers. 

Chris also writes novels of suspense and romance for adults under the name Kris Bock; read excerpts at www.krisbock.com.

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Editing Your Novel during #NaNoEdMo – Fine Tuning

In honor of #NaNoEdMo (National Novel Editing Month), I'm sharing some advice from You Can Write for Children: A Guide to Writing Great Stories, Articles, and Books for Kids and TeenagersLast week I offered advice on “big picture” editing. Once you're comfortable with the overall structure and content of your novel, it's time to consider the details.

Fine Tuning
 
Once you are confident that your characters, plot, structure, and pacing are working, you can dig into the smaller details. At this stage, make sure that your timeline works and your setting hangs together. Create calendars and maps to keep track of when things happen and where people go.

Then polish, polish, polish.

Bill Peschel, author of Sherlock Holmes parodies and other books for adults, and a former newspaper copy editor, says, “Reading with a critical eye reveals weak spots in grammar, consistently misspelled words, and a reliance on ‘crutch words’ [unnecessary and overused words] such as simply, basically, or just. While it can be disheartening to make the same mistakes over and over again, self-editing can boost your ego when you become aware that you’re capable of eliminating them from your work. It takes self-awareness, some education, and a willingness to admit to making mistakes.”

This stage of editing can be time-consuming, especially if you are prone to spelling or grammatical errors. “Be systematic,” Peschel says. “Despite all the advice on how to multi-task, the brain operates most efficiently when it’s focusing on one problem at a time. This applies to proofing. You can look for spelling mistakes, incorrect grammar, and your particular weaknesses, just not at the same time. So for effective proofing, make several passes, each time focusing on a different aspects.”

One pass might focus only on dialogue. “Read just the dialogue out loud,” editor Jodie Renner suggests, “maybe role-playing with a buddy or two. Do the conversations sound natural or stilted? Does each character sound different, or do they all sound like the author?”

Wordiness (using more words than necessary) is a big problem for many writers, so make at least one pass focused exclusively on tightening. “Make every word count,” Renner advises. “Take out whole sentences and paragraphs that don’t add anything new or drive the story forward. Take out unnecessary little words, most adverbs and many adjectives, and eliminate clichés.” Words you can almost always cut include very, really, just, sort of, kind of, a little, rather, started to, began to, then. To pick up the pace in your manuscript, try to cut 20% of the text on every page, simply by looking for unnecessary words or longer phrases that can be changed to shorter ones.

Make additional passes looking for grammar errors, missing words, and your personal weak areas. For example, if you know you tend to overuse “just,” use the “Find” option in a program like Microsoft Word to locate that word and eliminate it when possible.

Even if you’re not an expert editor, you may be able to sense when something is wrong. “Trust your inner voice,” when you get an uneasy feeling, Peschel says. “It can be something missing, something wrong, something clunky, and if you stick to it – read it out loud, read it backwards, look at it from a distance – the mistake should declare itself.”

Fool Your Brain

By this point, you’ve read your manuscript dozens of times. This can make it hard to spot errors, since you know what is supposed to be there. Several tricks can help you see your work with fresh eyes.

Peschel says, “Reading the same prose in the same font can cause the eye to skate over mistakes, so change it up. Boost the size or change the color of the text or try a different font. Use free programs such as Calibre or Scrivener to create an EPUB or MOBI file that can be read on an ebook reader.”

Renner also recommends changing your font. Print your manuscript on paper if you are used to working on the computer screen. Finally, move away from your normal working place to review your manuscript. “These little tricks will help you see the manuscript as a reader instead of as a writer,” she says.

“An effective way to check the flow of your story is to read it aloud or have someone read it to you,” freelance editor Linda Lane notes. “Better yet, record your story so you can play it back multiple times if necessary. Recruiting another person to do this will give you a better idea of what a reader will see.” Some software, such as MS Word 2010, has a text-to-voice feature to provide a read aloud.

Lane adds, “If recording your story yourself, run your finger just below each line as you read to catch omitted or misspelled words and missing commas, quote marks, and periods. Also, enunciate clearly and ‘punctuate’ as you read, pausing slightly at each comma and a bit longer at end punctuation. While this won’t catch every error, it will give you a good sense of flow, highlight many shortcomings, and test whether your dialogue is smooth and realistic.”

Some people even recommend reading your manuscript backwards, sentence by sentence. While this won’t help you track the flow of the story, it focuses attention on the sentence level. Finally, certain computer programs and web platforms are designed to identify spelling and grammar errors, and in some cases even identify clichés. While these programs are not recommended for developmental editing (when you’re shaping the story), they can be an option for later polishing. (They can also make mistakes, though, so don’t trust Microsoft Word’s spelling & grammar check to be right about everything.)

How Much Is Enough?

How much editing you need to do depends on your goals for the story. If you simply want to write down the bedtime stories you tell your children as a family record, a spelling error or two doesn’t matter too much. If you are going to submit work to a publisher, you need to be more careful. Some editors and agents say they will stop reading if they find errors in the first few pages, or more than one typo every few pages. If you plan to self-publish, most experts advise hiring a professional editor to help you shape the story and a professional proofreader to make sure the book doesn’t go out with typos. Weak writing and other errors could cause readers to get annoyed and leave bad reviews.

Looking at all the steps to successful self-editing may be daunting, but break them down into pieces, take a step at a time, and don’t rush your revisions. “This whole process could easily take several months,” Renner says. “Don’t shoot yourself in the foot by putting your manuscript out too soon.”

Each time you go through this process you’ll be developing your skills, making the next time easier. “Like anything else, self-editing becomes easier the more you do it,” Peschel says. “When it becomes second-nature, you’ll have made a big leap toward becoming a professional writer.”

Stop by next Wednesday for final tips on editing – or subscribe to get posts automatically and never miss a post. You can use the Subscribe buttons to the right, or add http://chriseboch.blogspot.com/ to Feedly or another reader.

You can get the extended version of this essay, and a lot more, in You Can Write for Children: A Guide to Writing Great Stories, Articles, and Books for Kids and Teenagers. Order for Kindle, in paperback, or in Large Print paperback. Advanced Plotting also has advice on editing novels.

Chris Eboch writes fiction and nonfiction for all ages, with over 30 traditionally published books for children. Learn more at www.chriseboch.com or her Amazon page. Sign up for Chris’s Workshop Newsletter for classes and critique offers.


Chris also writes novels of suspense and romance for adults under the name Kris Bock; read excerpts at www.krisbock.com

Monday, March 7, 2016

Resources for Diversity in Children's Literature

I'm preparing for an SCBWI Shop Talk on diversity in children's literature. This is the list of "Resources for Diversity" I developed. It is certainly not all-inclusive, but it has places to start. I'm posting it here so that people who attend the talk have live links all in one place. And anyone else is certainly welcome to browse or share!

Resources for Diversity:

Chris Eboch’s blog post has links to all of the sites below:
http://chriseboch.blogspot.com/2016/03/resources-for-diversity.html 

SCBWI has a page of Diversity Resources including blogs and websites, awards, organizations and articles: https://www.scbwi.org/diversity-resources/

SCBWI also has grants to promote diversity and children’s books: http://www.scbwi.org/awards/grants/grants-to-promote-diversity-in-childrens-books/

The Children’s Book Council CBC Diversity shares news encouraging diversity of race, gender, geographical region, sexual orientation, and class: http://www.cbcdiversity.com/ 

Cynthia Leitich Smith’s blog often touches on diversity or links to articles about it. Her Exploring Diversity page links to book lists about many religions/races, with relevant interviews: http://www.cynthialeitichsmith.com/lit_resources/diversity/multicultural/communities.html 

Multiculturalism Rocks! is a blog celebrating multiculturalism in children’s literature, with many useful links: http://nathaliemvondo.wordpress.com/ 

We Need Diverse Books promotes changes in the publishing industry to produce literature that reflects all young people: http://weneeddiversebooks.org/ 

Disability in Kidlit examines the portrayal of disability: http://disabilityinkidlit.com/ 

Author Lee Wind’s blog lists books with gay teen characters or themes, interviews with agents seeking diverse stories, videos on gender identity, and more: http://www.leewind.org/ 

DiversifYA “is a collection of interviews that allows us to share our stories, all of us. All sorts of diversity and all marginalized experiences.” http://www.diversifya.com/ 

Reading While White, a blog by librarians, has interesting blog posts on children's lit subjects, and a page of "Resources for Further Research": http://readingwhilewhite.blogspot.com/

This post on the SCBWI blog links to articles regarding A Birthday Cake For George Washington: http://scbwi.blogspot.com/2016/01/have-you-been-following-a-birthday-cake.html

Mitali Perkins often touches on diversity subjects on her blog: http://www.mitaliblog.com/ 
A particularly valuable post is “The Danger of a Single Story, Once Again”: http://www.mitaliblog.com/2015/11/the-danger-of-single-story-once-again.html

“You Will Be Tokenized”: Speaking Out About the State of Diversity in Publishing by Molly McArdle has voices from the front lines: http://tinyurl.com/z2p9sbo 

“We’ve Been Out Here Working”: Diversity in Publishing, a Partial Reading List has many links on the subject: http://tinyurl.com/josp8hk